University of Scranton Masters and Honors Theses Collection Guide

University of Scranton Masters and Honors Theses

Collection Guide

Summary

Abstract
Graduate and undergraduate theses written by masters and honors students at the University of Scranton and its predecessor, St. Thomas College.
Relation
Subset of University of Scranton Archives
Source
University of Scranton Students
Creator(s)
University of Scranton Students
Date Range
1952 - Present
Language(s)
English

Access and Use

Digital Access

For all digitized and born digital theses, access permissions are determined by the author. Thesis authors may choose to allow full public access to their work, restrict online access to on-campus users only, or deny online access for all users. Current University of Scranton students who are completing a masters thesis or honors project are asked to sign an Electronic Theses Approval Form so that their theses may be included in this collection. Questions about permissions and access may be directed to the Library at etheses@scranton.edu.

Physical Access

Print theses (listed in the Weinberg Memorial Library catalog) may be browsed by appointment in the Reading Room of the University Archives and McHugh Special Collections.

Rights

All theses remain under the copyright of the original author. For many digitized and born digital theses, the author has granted to the University of Scranton a non-exclusive license to publish a copy of the thesis in our digital collections, under specified access conditions: open to the public, restricted to on-campus users, or restricted to Library staff only.

Preferred Citation

[Author Name], [Thesis Title], [Date], University of Scranton Masters and Honors Theses, The University of Scranton Archives. [Reference URL for digital items]

Linked Data


Contents

Scope and Content Note

This collection includes print volumes as well as digitized and born digital versions of masters and honors theses.

Prior to 2008, students submitted only print versions of theses. Masters theses completed prior to 2008 were generally bound in black hardcover. These bound volumes included an original copy of the student's thesis approval form (familiarly known as the "signature page"), which includes the signatures of the student's research mentor and advisory committee. Honors theses were submitted to the University Archives in print, generally bound with plastic spiral combs and purple cardstock covers. Print theses included advisors' signatures.

In 2008, the Weinberg Memorial Library implemented a born digital submission process for both masters and honors theses. Since 2008, masters students have been required to submit both digital and print versions of their thesis. Print theses, which are not bound but foldered, include an original copy of the student's Graduate and Continuing Education Services (GCES) thesis approval form (familiarly known as the "signature page"), which includes the signatures of the student's research mentor and advisory committee. Digital theses may or may not include a digitized image of this page.

Since 2008, honors students have been required to submit a digital version to the Weinberg Memorial Library for the University Archives while submitting a print version (with advisors' signatures) to the Honors Program coordinator. Thus the University Archives does not hold print copies of all honors theses from this period.

System of Arrangement

Theses are organized into two series, based on whether the thesis fulfills a requirement for a graduate degree (Series I) or undergraduate honors program (Series II).

Inventory

Series I. Masters Theses

This series includes theses completed by graduate students in order to fulfill a requirement for a graduate program. The earliest masters theses were completed in 1952 by students enrolled in the University's Master of Arts in Education program.

Series II. Honors Theses

This series includes theses completed by undergraduate students participating in the University's Honors Program.

Digital Accruals

Newly completed masters theses are added to the collection throughout the academic year, as they are submitted. Newly completed honors theses are added to the collection each spring, at the close of the academic year.


Acquisition Information

Theses are submitted to the University Archives by the authoring student at the time of their graduation.


Processing Notes

Digitization

In 2009, the University Archives sent letters to all prior thesis authors for whom contact information was available, requesting permission to digitize the print volume of their work for online publication. If the author returned a signed Electronic Thesis Approval Form, his or her thesis was subsequently digitized and made available online according to the author's specified access conditions (open to the public or restricted to on-campus users).

Three batches of print theses were digitized in 2009 and 2012. Digitization was outsourced to Kirtas Technologies in Victor, New York. Bound volumes were digitized in TIFF format at 300 dpi in black and white (bitonal). Derivative PDFs were prepared for display and access. Searchable text was generated via automated optical character recognition (OCR).

Personal addresses, birth dates, and Social Security numbers were redacted from digitized theses.

Processing

For born digital theses submitted in proprietary formats (such as Microsoft Word), a derivative PDF version is prepared for display and preservation.

Harvesting

Metadata from this collection is exposed via Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH). Known, active harvests include: